apache

  • user warning: Table './johnandcailincmsdb/node_counter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT totalcount, daycount, timestamp FROM node_counter WHERE nid = 101 in /var/www/drupal/includes/database.mysql.inc on line 172.
  • user warning: Table './johnandcailincmsdb/node_counter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT totalcount, daycount, timestamp FROM node_counter WHERE nid = 90 in /var/www/drupal/includes/database.mysql.inc on line 172.
  • user warning: Table './johnandcailincmsdb/node_counter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT totalcount, daycount, timestamp FROM node_counter WHERE nid = 85 in /var/www/drupal/includes/database.mysql.inc on line 172.
  • user warning: Table './johnandcailincmsdb/node_counter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT totalcount, daycount, timestamp FROM node_counter WHERE nid = 82 in /var/www/drupal/includes/database.mysql.inc on line 172.
  • user warning: Table './johnandcailincmsdb/node_counter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: SELECT totalcount, daycount, timestamp FROM node_counter WHERE nid = 68 in /var/www/drupal/includes/database.mysql.inc on line 172.

scaling drupal step three - using heartbeat to implement a redundant load balancer

if you've setup a clustered drupal deployment (see scaling drupal step two - sticky load balancing with apache mod_proxy), a good next-step, is to cluster your load balancer.

one way to do this is to use heartbeat to provide instant failover to a redundant load balancer should your primary fail. while the method suggested below doesn't increase the loadbalancer scalability, which shouldn't be an issue for a reasonably sized deployment, it does increase your the redundancy. as usual, my examples are for apache2, mysql5 and drupal5 on debian etch. see the scalability overview for related articles.

scaling drupal step two - sticky load balancing with apache mod_proxy

if you've setup your drupal deployment with a separate database and web (drupal) server (see scaling drupal step one - a dedicated data server), a good next step, is to cluster your web servers. drupal generates a considerable load on the web server and can quickly become resource constrained there. having multiple web servers also increases the the redundancy of your deployment. as usual, my examples are for apache2, mysql5 and drupal5 on debian etch. see the scalability overview for related articles.

scaling drupal step one - a dedicated data server

if you've already installed drupal on a single node (see easy-peasy-lemon-squeezy drupal installation on linux), a good first step to scaling a drupal install is to create a dedicated data server. by dedicated data server i mean a server that hosts both the database and a fileshare for node attachments etc. this splits the database server load from the web server, and lays the groundwork for a clustered web server deployment. here's how you can do it. as usual, my examples are for apache2, mysql5 and drupal5 on debian etch. see the scalability overview for related articles.

easy-peasy-lemon-squeezy drupal installation on linux

installing drupal is pretty easy, but it's even easier if you have a step by step guide. i've written one that will produce a basic working configuration with drupal5 on debian etch with php5, mysql5 and apache2. it might be a help on other configurations too. see the scalability overview for related articles.

protecting your drupal site under development

while you are developing your user site, you probably want to protect it from prying eyes. you can do this using a drupal module or an apache configuration.

syndicate content